Geo-fleur Workshop: Building a Terrarium

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

Today I’m really excited to have a guest post from lovely writer, Sam Curtis, of Output Magazine. Sam is another creative workshop and crafts fan, so hopefully we’ll have a few more posts from her in the near future.

Without further ado, take it away Sam!

 


I’m a bit of a cacti hoarder, I must admit. Not only are they absolutely adorable but they’re also incredibly hard to kill – which is a plus for me as I’m terrible at remembering to water plants. When I saw that geo-fleur was running a terrarium workshop I knew I had to attend to add something special to my ever-growing collection of indestructible foliage.

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

The workshop was run at West-Elm on Tottenham Court Road, by the lovely Sophie, who sells her wares online and now in her new shop at Wood St Indoor Market.

Obviously, the first thing you need to build a terrarium is the pot itself. You could either buy one in advance or pick one up at West Elm ahead of the workshop. I bought one from Sophie and she brought it along on the day, and a few attendees had bought fish and even fruit bowls from charity shops!

Sophie started off the session by showing us how to prepare our succulents and cacti for planting, and giving us a step-by-step demonstration on how to put everything together. Afterwards we were left to choose our plants and were guided on how to pick different textures and colours to compliment our arrangement.

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

First off we covered the bottom of our terrariums with rocks and pebbles. Next came soil, then activated charcoal (to retain moisture) and finally we could begin planting!

I’m afraid to say that I didn’t get many pictures of the process; it is an incredibly quick business to get your cacti and succulents to behave. It takes a lot of careful soil placement to make sure that they stay in the position you want, and a lot of finger injuries along the way!

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

Through blood, sweat and cacti needles I was left with a lovely, albeit messy, terrarium that I adore. After everything was in place we had the choice to decorate our miniature gardens with pebbles or moss. I chose moss and really enjoyed how it made everything look like it belonged in the wilderness.

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

My advice for people wanting to make these at home is to choose a display with a wide base. Mine was very deceptive as it seemed big, but the aperture and base was quite narrow making it hard for the plants to anchor as there wasn’t much room at the bottom. You also need to be a confident planter! Getting your hands in with the spikes is a bit scary at first, but you need to be firm to ensure that everything is in place.

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog

 

Sophie was a great teacher and the other ladies helping run the session were brilliant. I had a lot of trouble getting my plants to stay put but they were always on hand to help and show you how it should be done. This workshop is perfect for absolute beginners and has really inspired me to make more!

Geo-fleur has another terrarium workshop at Wood Street Market on August 22nd and at West-Elm on the 27th, which you can buy tickets for here. The sessions last 1.5 hours, cost £20 and include all materials, except for the terrarium itself.

 

Geo-fleur Terrarium Workshop - Sam Curtis for Inky Collective Blog


 

Thanks Sam! You can follow Sam’s other adventures over on Twitter, and hopefully here again before too long!

Jen Wright

Jen Wright

Letterpress printer, maker and freelance writer. I blog about the people and things that inspire me, in the hope that I will inspire you.
Jen Wright

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One Comment

  1. These are so precious, and they go for much more online. I have plants, but wattering and repotting them is becomming too difficult over time. This might just be a good alternative.

So, what do you think?